Plakatmotiv der Ausstellung Land in Sicht.
Exhibition | 13.03.2015 - 26.09.2015

Land in Sight

400 Years of Landscapes
Landscapes have always been an expression of social concepts. They tell in an impressive manner about our desires, dreams and fears. Whoever knows how to read them comes to see the world with new eyes. At the latest with the beginning of the ecological discussion, an untroubled experience of nature is scarcely conceivable any longer. Nature becomes the moral counter-image to our own culture. But deplorable political and economic situations also come into focus. The German artist Anselm Kiefer offers a succinct summary: “There is no landscape that is entirely innocent.”
Odilon Redon, Barque au clair de lune, o. D., Privatbesitz, Courtesy Stiftung Situation Kunst, Bochum
Odilon Redon, Barque au clair de lune, o. D., Privatbesitz, Courtesy Stiftung Situation Kunst, Bochum
Anselm Kiefer, Ohne Titel (Am Meer), 1969/72, MKM Museum Küppersmühle für Moderne Kunst, Duisburg, Sammlung Ströher, Foto: Kunstmuseum Bonn, Reni Hansen

The Weserburg, Bremen's museum for modern art, is presenting in an extensive special exhibition over 100 landscapes from four centuries. An impressive panorama unfolds from Gustave Courbet to Roy Lichtenstein, from Joos de Momper to Gerhard Richter. It extends from Dutch painting of the seventeenth century to the most recent positions of contemporary art. In addition to paintings, historical and contemporary photography as well as video works are also on display. In the thematic contrast between old and new, the seemingly familiar attains a surprising revaluation and contemporary relevance, while today's art comes to be understood in its historical dimension. 

“Pierre Bonnard, Gustave Courbet and Jan van Goyen have something fundamentally in common with Stan Douglas, Gerhard Richter and Richard Mosse which remains to be rediscovered: they reveal to us their view of the world, which ultimately proves to be a perspective onto our own lives,” explains Peter Friese, the managing director of the Weserburg. 

Richard Mosse, Thousands Are Sailing II, North Kivu, eastern Congo, 2012, Sammlung von Kelterborn, Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Carlier Gebauer and Jack Shainman Gallery.
Richard Mosse, Thousands Are Sailing II, North Kivu, eastern Congo, 2012, Sammlung von Kelterborn, Courtesy of the artist, Galerie Carlier Gebauer and Jack Shainman Gallery.

In his photography, Stan Douglas presents a fascinating, beautiful mountain panorama. But the idyll is disturbed by a smoke-emitting industrial facility. In this sense, David Teniers the Younger also includes a massive gallows in his “Landscape with Farmhouse” (1637-40). He thereby opens up a perspective onto a landscape that reveals the existential abyss within a friendly segment of nature. This is a fundamental theme of landscape art which we rediscover not only with Anselm Kiefer, but also with many other artists. The photographer Richard Mosse presents an enchantingly beautiful valley in shades of pink, into which is embedded a large refugee camp with thousands of people who have lost their native country, the Congo. 

David Teniers d. J., Landschaft mit Bauernhaus, um 1637-1640, Privatbesitz, Courtesy Stiftung Situation Kunst, Bochum
Roy Lichtenstein, Sunrise and Sunset, 1964, Privatbesitz, Courtesy Stiftung Situation Kunst, Bochum © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015
Roy Lichtenstein, Sunrise and Sunset, 1964, Privatbesitz, Courtesy Stiftung Situation Kunst, Bochum © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015
Unbekannt (Joint Army Task Force One), Baker Day Atomic Explosion, 1946, Privatbesitz, Courtesy Stiftung Situation Kunst, Bochum
Unbekannt (Joint Army Task Force One), Baker Day Atomic Explosion, 1946, Privatbesitz, Courtesy Stiftung Situation Kunst, Bochum

The documentary records of the US Navy concerning atomic tests on the Bikini Atoll include the horrifying beauty of a mushroom-cloud formation which profoundly unsettles our perception. Against this sort of background, Roy Lichtenstein's flashy pictorial signs evoking landscapes take on a new meaning. They demonstrate that an innocent point of view has become lost in nature. We see what we expect to see and believe ourselves to know, but also what we don't want to perceive.

Even in the landscapes of Gerhard Richter that seem at a first glance to adhere to a romantic pictorial concept, there are deliberate disturbances and ruptures as signs of the intervention of civilization and a no-longer-pristine nature. Thus the exhibition at the Weserburg becomes a site of discoveries where the familiar may be experienced anew. Landscapes of yearning manifest an unexpected menace; and precisely in this manner, they prove to be fascinating works of art.

The exhibition has been made possible by loans. A large part of the artworks come from a private collection, courtesy of the Stiftung Situation Kunst, Bochum. Further works come from the Böckmann Collection, Stöher Collection and von Kelterborn Collection as well as from further loaners. 

Gerhard Richter, Brücke (am Meer), 1969, Sammlung Böckmann
Gerhard Richter, Brücke (am Meer), 1969, Sammlung Böckmann, Neues Museum Nürnberg, Foto: Annette Karadisch

With the generous support of the Waldemar Koch Stiftung, the Sparkasse Bremen and the Museumsfreunde Weserburg. The media partner is Nordwestradio. 

Der Medienpartner ist Nordwestradio. 

Artists

Pierre Bonnard, Lovis Corinth, Gustave Courbet, Stan Douglas, Ger van Elk, Thomas Florschütz, Jan van Goyen, André Kertész, Anselm Kiefer, Almut Linde, Roy Lichtenstein, Hiroyuki Masuyama, Joos de Momper, Richard Mosse, Aert van der Neer, Simone Nieweg, Arnulf Rainer, Franz Radziwill, Odilon Redon, Michael Reisch, Gerhard Richter, Jacob van Ruisdael, Charles Soutine, Dirk Skreber, David Teniers the Younger, Wolfgang Tillmanns et al.

 

Free Admission and Guided Tours for Schools

For school classes of all ages, the Weserburg offers guided tours free of charge regarding various themes of the exhibition, with and without a practical segment. This offer is made possible thanks to the Waldemar Koch Stiftung. Early registration is recommended. Information and registration: 0421-59839-0 or sekretariat(at)weserburg.de.

 


Zusätzliche Sonderführungen

Wegen der großen Nachfrage: Zusätzliche Sonderführungen zu Land in Sicht an allen Samstagen im Juni, Juli, August und September jeweils um 15 Uhr. 

schau mal! - Land in Sicht

Kinderkulturprojekt von QUARTIER mit großer Begleitausstellung ab Juli in der Weserburg. Mehr als 500 Kinder und Jugendliche aus 37 Kinder- und Jugendeinrichtungen stellen ihre Arbeiten vor. [mehr]

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